The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday issued interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers who traveled or lived in an area with Zika virus transmission during their pregnancy. A marked increase in infants born with microcephaly, a birth defect resulting in smaller than normal head size, has been reported in the Zika outbreak in Brazil. It is not known how many of the cases are associated with the virus. Only about one in five people infected with the mosquito-borne virus will get sick, and their illness is usually mild. The most common symptoms are fever, rash, joint pain or conjunctivitis (red eyes). For more information, visit www.cdc.gov/zika.

Related News Articles

Headline
The World Health Organization today declared the Ebola virus disease outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo a public health emergency of…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare…
Headline
CMS anticipates releasing later this summer the feedback it received on potential methodology changes to the overall hospital quality star ratings, the agency…
Headline
The Health Resources and Services Administration yesterday recognized 10 states whose critical access hospitals had the highest quality reporting rates and…
Headline
Two investigational Ebola treatments being used in the ongoing outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are effective in laboratory studies.
Headline
HHS will bring together key health care stakeholders and government leaders to discuss how current quality programs can deliver better outcomes for patients.