China has reported 460 human infections with the H7N9 avian flu virus since last October, more than in any year since the novel virus emerged there in 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced last week. During the prior years, 88% of patients developed pneumonia, 68% were admitted to an intensive care unit and 41% died. H7N9 viruses have not been detected in people or birds in the United States and currently pose low risk to public health, CDC said. However, the agency is using reverse genetics to prepare a candidate vaccine virus and will continue to track the virus’ potential for pandemic risk. For more on the H7N9 virus, including guidance for U.S. clinicians, visit www.cdc.gov

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