An estimated 69 infants were born with perinatal HIV infection in 2013, down from 216 in 2002, according to a study published online today by JAMA Pediatrics. “The continuing prevalence of missed prevention opportunities suggests that the remaining HIV transmissions occur in a subset of the population that is particularly difficult to reach with the recommended interventions,” the authors said. They conclude that “new strategies and more intense public health interventions may be needed to maintain the achievements attained thus far and ultimately eliminate perinatal HIV transmission in the United States.”

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