The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week issued updated guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers with possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Infection during pregnancy can cause serious damage to the brain of the developing fetus. CDC provides specific guidance for three clinical scenarios describing possible maternal Zika virus exposure, and updated information on follow-up care and interpreting laboratory test results for infants. “There’s a lot we still don’t know about Zika, so it’s very important for us to keep a close eye on these babies as they develop,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D. “Learning how best to support them will require a team approach between health care providers and families.” For more information on Zika, visit www.cdc.gov/zika and www.aha.org/zika.

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