Many health care providers do not support using text messaging for medical orders, according to a survey released last week by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. The 778 respondents included nurses, pharmacists, prescribers, medication safety officers and others. One-third of respondents thought medical orders should not be texted under any circumstances, while 40% thought the practice was acceptable when using an encrypted device application. The most commonly cited concerns included the potential for unintended autocorrection of text, confusing abbreviations, misidentifications or misspellings.

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