Hospitals are experiencing shortages of sterile water used to reconstitute certain medications for injection, according to a new factsheet by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists and University of Utah Drug Information Service, which includes strategies to help pharmacists and organizations mitigate these shortages. “Without a consistent supply of SW for injection, health care personnel need to decide between selecting other therapies as treatments or using a sterile liquid other than SW for injection despite a lack of definite information about the effects on drug stability and compatibility,” the factsheet notes. “The consequences of using a sterile liquid not listed in product labeling to reconstitute medication vials may include poor dissolution of the powder, precipitation, or deactivation of the active pharmaceutical ingredient before further dilution or administration.” For more on the SW shortages, see the Food and Drug Administration and ASHP drug shortage databases.

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