More than 43% of adults were enrolled in a high-deductible health plan through their employer in 2017, up from 15% in 2007, according to a report released today by the National Center for Health Statistics. More than half of them did not have a health savings account, a tax-advantaged fund to help pay for the higher costs associated with an HDHP; those who did were more affluent and highly educated than those who did not. The findings are from the National Health Interview Survey, which in 2017 defined an HDHP as a private health plan with a deductible of at least $1,300 for self-only coverage and $2,600 for family coverage.
 

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