An estimated 8.8 percent (28.5 million) of U.S. residents lacked health insurance for the entire year in 2017, not statistically different from 2016, the Census Bureau reported today. Between 2016 and 2017, the number of people with health insurance coverage increased by 2.3 million, up to 294.6 million, according to the report. In 2017, Hispanic residents had the highest uninsured rate (16.1 percent), followed by black (10.6 percent) and Asian (7.3 percent) residents. Children and adults in poverty had higher uninsured rates than those not in poverty. The percentage of people without health insurance coverage at the time of survey interview decreased in three states and increased in 14 states. The report is based on the Current Population Survey and American Community Survey.  

Related News Articles

Insights and Analysis
In this AHA Stat Blog, Institute for Diversity and Health Equity President and CEO Duane Reynolds shares some takeaways from the recent ACHE conference and…
Insights and Analysis
This week, as part of the South by Southwest (SXSW) festival’s Interactive Health and MedTech track, the American Hospital Association and hospital leaders…
Headline
Creating a government-run, Medicare-like option on the individual health insurance exchanges could negatively affect patient access to care and reduce hospital…
Insights and Analysis
Please consider applying for the award and sharing how your organization is improving health equity and value.
Headline
Hospitals and health systems may apply through Feb. 19 for the 2019 AHA Equity of Care Award, which recognizes organizations participating in the AHA's #…
Headline
Hospitals and health systems may apply through Feb. 19 for the 2019 AHA Equity of Care Award, which recognizes organizations participating in the AHA's #…