The drug overdose death rate among U.S. women aged 30 to 64 years old increased 260 percent between 1999 and 2017, to 24.3 per 100,000 people, according to data released yesterday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Overdose death rates increased for all drug categories examined, including a 1,643 percent increase for synthetic opioids, 915 percent increase for heroin and 830 percent increase for benzodiazepines. The average age at death increased by nearly three years to 46.3. “Prevention programs might need to shift response options as the overdose epidemic experiences demographic shifts,” the authors said. “Further, as women progress through life, individual experiences can change in the type of substance used or misused and in the experiences of pain that might result in an opioid prescription.”

Related News Articles

Headline
The National Academies of Sciences Engineering, and Medicine yesterday released recommendations for improving outcomes and metrics associated with four grant…
Headline
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Friday awarded $450 million in grants, including $250 million in emergency COVID-19 funding, to…
Headline
Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., this week reintroduced the Protecting Jessica Grubb’s Legacy Act (S. 3374), AHA-supported…
Headline
The House Energy and Commerce Health Subcommittee today held a hearing titled “Combatting an Epidemic: Legislation to Help Patients with Substance Use…
Headline
Nearly 72,600 Americans died from alcohol-related causes in 2017, double the number in 1999, according to a new study by the National Institute on Alcohol…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services today selected 10 states to receive funding under the Maternal Opioid Misuse Model to help coordinate and…