Patients in the most rural counties had an 87 percent greater chance of receiving an opioid prescription from their primary care provider between January 2014 and March 2017 than patients in large metropolitan areas, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prescribing rates were higher in rural than urban counties throughout the study period, but decreased across all rural and urban categories after the CDC released its guidelines for prescribing opioids for chronic pain in March 2016. “As less densely populated areas indicate both progress in decreasing opioid prescribing and need for ongoing reduction, tailoring community health care practices and intervention programs to community characteristics will remain important,” the authors said. The findings are based on electronic health record data from a sample of primary care providers. For AHA resources to help hospitals and health systems address the opioid epidemic, including a recently updated toolkit, visit www.aha.org.

Related News Articles

Headline
Public or nonprofit rural organizations can apply through Nov. 25 for funding to support integrated rural health care networks.
Headline
The Health Resources and Services Administration yesterday awarded 80 rural consortia $1 million each to help prevent, treat and support recovery for patients…
Headline
Offering a government insurance program reimbursing at Medicare rates as a public option on the health insurance exchanges could place as many as 55% of rural…
Headline
The National Association of Attorneys General yesterday urged congressional leaders to remove federal barriers to opioid use disorder treatment.
Headline
The number of naloxone prescriptions dispensed from retail pharmacies doubled in 2018, but access to the emergency opioid overdose treatment still varies…
Headline
In a commentary published in Academic Medicine, experts outline how academic medicine, medical education, public health agencies, hospital associations and…