The hepatitis C infection rate among women giving birth rose 400% between 2000 and 2015 to 4.1 per 1,000 deliveries, according to a study of hospital discharge data released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The rate was much higher among women with opioid use disorder (216.9 per 1,000 deliveries), suggesting a link between the increase and the opioid crisis, the authors said. The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommend hepatitis C screening for all pregnant women. “Although treatment of HCV infection with direct-acting antiviral agents during pregnancy is not approved, testing remains important to identify infections, engage infected women in postpartum treatment, and identify infants who might have been exposed,” the report notes.

Related News Articles

Headline
While the COVID-19 pandemic placed a pause on routine medical visits and non-emergency procedures, people are still giving birth and in need of support from…
Blog
While COVID-19 has impacted routine medical visits and non-emergency procedures, people are still giving birth and in need of support. Across the country,…
Headline
The AHA today responded to a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services request for information by offering solutions for improving maternal and child health…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday issued revised guidance for pediatric clinicians on caring for newborns with confirmed or suspected…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday issued a health advisory warning of COVID-19-associated multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children…
Headline
A new AHA resource shares ways hospitals and health systems are caring for mothers and babies during the COVID-19 crisis. The resource examines labor and…