The COVID-19 pandemic could increase “deaths of despair” from alcohol, drug misuse and suicide by between 27,644 and 154,037 over the decade, depending how quickly the economy recovers, according to a study released Friday by Well Being Trust and the Robert Graham Center for Policy Studies in Family Medicine and Primary Care.

The authors emphasize that the report “is not a call to suddenly reopen the country,” but to maintain infection control while addressing the nation’s mental health and addiction needs. “This begins with a recognition of the complex interplay between employment status and our overall health and well-being,” the authors said.

The AHA and its Physician Alliance have developed new resources to help medical professionals, behavioral health providers and the general public maintain their mental and emotional well-being during the COVID-19 emergency, including webinars, podcasts, case studies and other materials that offer strategies for recovering physical and mental health and energy.

Related News Articles

Headline
Health care providers who received approval to submit a late report on how they used Provider Relief Fund payments received from July 1 to Dec. 31, 2020, must…
Headline
Hospitals are contending with an exhausted workforce, backlogs of care deferred by the pandemic, cracks in the supply chain and a tsunami of financial…
Headline
In a study examining electronic health records for adults who visited an inpatient or outpatient facility between March 2020 and November 2021, COVID-19…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention today released updated guidance for clinicians treating COVID-19 in patients who received the Pfizer COVID-19…
Headline
Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine booster for children under age 5 was 80.3% effective and well tolerated in a clinical trial involving 1,678 children who received the…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday recommended children age 5-11 receive a booster dose five months after completing the Pfizer COVID-19…