A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine is confirming the role Medicare plays in decreasing disparities in health care access and coverage in the U.S. The authors, by analyzing 10 years of data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and the Wide-Ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research (WONDER) system, found that overall, health care access improved across racial lines for adults age 65 and over following Medicare enrollment.

In examining the links between Medicare eligibility and racial and ethnic disparities in access to care, the study found a 53% reduction between white and Black adults and a 51% reduction in the disparity between white and Hispanic adults. Disparity levels also dropped among specific U.S. regions at age 65, with Hispanic respondents experiencing the largest reductions in uninsured rates in the Midwest and South regions, with Black respondents in the Northeast and South regions having the largest reductions inlluninsured rates. 

Related News Articles

Headline
Atrium Health executive Carol Lovin speaks with Sue Ellen Wagner, AHA vice president, trustee engagement and strategy, about board strategies to advance equity…
Headline
The AHA and its Institute for Diversity and Health Equity are now accepting applications for the 2022 Carolyn Boone Lewis Equity of Care Awards. The…
Blog
Post-acute care (PAC) providers continue to play a central role in COVID-19 response and recovery. In particular, providers in COVID-19 hotspots have been…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services yesterday proposed repealing a final rule codifying how it defines “reasonable and necessary” coverage…
Headline
The National Institutes of Health yesterday released a study revealing a 38% increase in the opioid overdose death rate for non-Hispanic Black people in four…
Headline
The House Ways and Means Committee today started its budget reconciliation markup of the Build Back Better Act, which will consider a number of health…