The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention late yesterday confirmed a case of human monkeypox in a U.S. resident who recently traveled from Nigeria to the United States. The person is currently in isolation in Maryland. CDC is working with the airline and international, state and local health officials to contact airline passengers and others who may have had contact with the patient. CDC believes the risk of spread to other travelers on the flight to the U.S. is low because they were required to wear masks on the plane and in U.S. airports due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

CDC asks U.S. health care providers to watch for poxvirus-like lesions, particularly among travelers returning from Nigeria, and to report suspected cases immediately to state or local public health authorities regardless of whether they are also exploring other potential diagnoses. 

A rare but potentially serious viral illness, monkeypox typically begins with flu-like illness and swelling of the lymph nodes and progresses to a widespread rash on the face and body. Monkeypox re-emerged in Nigeria in 2017 after more than 40 years with no reported cases. Since then eight cases have been reported in international travelers from Nigeria, including a case this July in Texas.
 

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