As proposed yesterday by its Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that starting this fall all infants under 8 months old receive one dose of the new long-acting monoclonal antibody nirsevimab to prevent respiratory syncytial virus, and that certain infants 8-19 months old at risk for severe disease receive one dose in their second RSV season. The Food and Drug Administration last month approved the product for use in these age groups. An estimated 58,000 to 80,000 U.S. children under age 5, mostly infants, are hospitalized each year due to RSV. 

“RSV is the leading cause of hospitalizations for infants and older babies at higher risk and today we have taken an important step to make this life saving product available,” said CDC director Mandy Cohen, M.D.
 

Related News Articles

Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Feb. 8 released a proposed rule intended to strengthen oversight of organizations that accredit health care…
Headline
The Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights Jan. 25 released guidance reminding hospitals, critical access hospitals and long-term…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Dec. 4 released an interim final rule implementing new enforcement authorities the agency will use if states…
Headline
The Food and Drug Administration Sept. 29 released a proposed rule that would phase out over four years its general enforcement discretion approach for most…
Headline
Waleed Javaid, M.D., director of infection prevention and control at Mount Sinai Health System in New York, shares successful strategies for eliminating…
Headline
The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals should reverse the Federal Trade Commission’s decision in Illumina Inc. v. FTC, “a paradigmatic example” of how the agency’s…