AHA’s Maryjane Wurth to Retire in 2020; Michelle Hood to Join the Association

CHICAGO (November 14, 2019) – Maryjane Wurth, the American Hospital Association’s (AHA) executive vice president and chief operating officer (COO), will retire next year after a long and distinguished career in the hospital association field.

 

Joining the AHA as its next executive vice president and COO is Michelle Hood, president and CEO at Northern Light Health in Brewer, Maine. Hood currently serves on the AHA Board of Trustees.

 

Wurth has been a guiding force in positioning the AHA as a leader for health innovation and change. During her time at the association, she oversaw the creation of the AHA Center for Health Innovation, revamped the business model for AHA’s for-profit subsidiary and led a task force that identified new ways to engage hospitals and health systems in the work of the association, among other critical initiatives.

“Maryjane is one of the most respected health care executives in our field. She has earned the trust and admiration from the AHA Board as well as her colleagues at the AHA and state hospital associations,” said AHA President and CEO Rick Pollack. “While she joined the association nearly four years ago, Maryjane has been an important contributor to the AHA for many years. She has made significant contributions on some of our field’s most important issues and improved health in America.”

Before coming to the AHA, Wurth ran the Illinois Health and Hospital Association as president and CEO. Earlier, she served as COO of the Healthcare Association of New York State (HANYS), as well as president and CEO of HANYS Solutions, Inc., the association’s for-profit subsidiary.

Hood will join the AHA next year and overlap with Wurth to ensure a smooth transition. In addition to serving on AHA’s Board of Trustees, Hood is on its Executive Committee and chairs the board’s Operations Committee.

“Michelle is an experienced health system CEO — who is known for her creative leadership — and knows the AHA well,” said Pollack. “She will bring her passion for and deep experience in making health care better for patients to her new role.”

Throughout her career, Hood has held positions at academic, national faith-based and rural health care systems. She came to Northern Light Health (formerly Eastern Maine Healthcare Systems) in April 2006 from Billings, Mont., where she was president and CEO of the Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth Health System, Montana Region, as well as president and CEO of its flagship hospital, St. Vincent Healthcare. Hood served on the boards of three state hospital associations and chaired two of those organizations.
 
She is on several community and national boards, including serving as past chair of both the University of Maine System Board of Trustees and the Vizient New England Board. Hood received a Bachelor of Science from Purdue University and a Master of Health Care Administration from Georgia State University.

About the American Hospital Association

The AHA is a not-for-profit association of health care provider organizations and individuals that are committed to the health improvement of their communities. The AHA is the national advocate for its members, which include nearly 5,000 hospitals, health care systems, networks, other providers of care and 43,000 individual members. Founded in 1898, the AHA provides education for health care leaders and is a source of information on health care issues and trends. For more information, visit the AHA website at www.aha.org.

 

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Contact:       Colin Milligan, (202) 638-5491

                      Marie Johnson, (202) 626-2351

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