Progress is encouraging; continuous progress promises a better future. Between 2010 and 2014, the Department of Health and Human Services estimates that 87,000 fewer patients died in hospitals and almost $20 billion in health care costs were saved because of patient safety efforts in hospitals. That translates to a 17% reduction in the number of hospital-acquired conditions. While our objective is to get to zero, this represents strong progress to reaching that goal. That’s because hospitals have been actively engaged in a number of national quality improvement projects, such as those to reduce CLABSIs and CAUTIs. We are also extremely proud that AHA’s Health Research & Educational Trust has worked with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 34 state hospital associations and 1,600 hospitals to convene the largest hospital engagement network and that their work was recently funded for another year. These results are another milestone on our journey to providing the best care possible for patients and communities.

Related News Articles

Headline
The Food and Drug Administration today proposed reclassifying surgical staplers for internal use as moderate-risk rather than low-risk medical devices.
Headline
Civica Rx, the not-for-profit generic drug company, officially opened its headquarters last week in Lehi, Utah.
Blog
We must address the racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities that increase the risk of negative perinatal outcomes for women of color.
Blog
AHA Executive Vice President Maryjane Wurth previews AHA’s Team Training Conference, where different interdisciplinary groups from diverse health care settings…
Headline
The Food and Drug Administration today ordered manufacturers to immediately stop selling and distributing surgical mesh products for transvaginal repair of…
Headline
Readmissions penalties for hospitals with the greatest share of dually eligible beneficiaries could fall by an estimated $22.4 million in fiscal year 2019,…