“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.”

– Martin Luther King Jr.

Black History Month is the perfect time to ask, “What progress is your hospital making in equity of care? What progress are you making in support of the idea that a person’s fate in life should not be predetermined by the color of their skin?” 

The AHA’s #123forEquity campaign is critically important to the effort to end health care disparities and advance diversity and inclusion.

More than 1,140 hospitals and health systems and 60 state and metropolitan associations have signed the pledge to take specific actions to increase the collection and use of data on race, ethnicity and language preference, as well as on cultural competency training and diversity in leadership and governance. Signers also commit to report on their progress promoting diversity.

We are not done – not by a long shot. Achieving care equity and greater diversity is a crucial part of solving America’s current – and future – health care challenges. Equitable care for all patients is both the right thing to do and central to hospitals’ ongoing quality improvement work and part of a business imperative moving forward.  

Have you signed the pledge? If not, please do so today.

Related News Articles

Headline
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration will launch a three-part virtual learning series on recovery supports for people considering or…
Perspective
Improving rural health is an AHA priority because we truly cannot advance health in America without keeping our rural communities strong.
Headline
The House of Representatives last night voted 419-6 to pass legislation (H.R. 748) that would repeal the 40% excise tax on high-value employer-sponsored health…
Headline
The ERISA Industry Committee has withdrawn its support for legislation approved yesterday by the House Energy and Commerce Committee to address surprise…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare…
Headline
Drug overdose deaths declined 5.1% in 2018 to about 68,000, according to preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.