Hospitalizations for opioid abuse/dependence increased 72% between 2002 and 2012 to an estimated 520,275 per year, while hospitalizations for opioid-associated infections rose 91% to 6,535, according to a study published today in Health Affairs. Intravenous administration of opioids and heroin can cause serious infections, such as endocarditis and septic arthritis, increasing hospitalization costs. “These findings have important implications for the hospitals and government agencies that disproportionately shoulder these costs and for clinicians, researchers and policymakers interested in estimating the potential impact of targeted public health interventions at the national level,” the authors said.

Related News Articles

Headline
Qualified nonprofits and government agencies may submit through Aug. 25 letters of intent to apply for funding from the Foundation for Opioid Response Efforts…
Headline
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration will launch a three-part virtual learning series on recovery supports for people considering or…
Headline
Drug overdose deaths declined 5.1% in 2018 to about 68,000, according to preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Headline
Under a new Centers for Medicare…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare…
Headline
Six health care organizations in rural North Carolina communities will share $1.2 million in federal grant funds to strengthen and expand their response to…