Medicare accountable care organizations are associated with modest reductions in spending and use of hospitals and emergency departments, according to a study published this week by JAMA Internal Medicine. The study compared changes in spending and usage for beneficiaries cared for by ACO physicians and non-ACO physicians between January 2009 and December 2013, including a subgroup of clinically vulnerable beneficiaries. After ACO contract implementation, quarterly spending per beneficiary decreased by $34 in the study’s overall Medicare population and $114 in the clinically vulnerable population, which included patients with conditions such as diabetes, coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure.

Related News Articles

Headline
The Fund for Access to Inpatient Rehabilitation late yesterday announced that the government will settle backlogged Medicare inpatient rehabilitation facility…
Headline
The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission Friday issued its June report to Congress, which includes several recommendations approved by the panel during its…
Headline
The House Ways and Means Committee today held a hearing on “Pathways to Universal Health Coverage,” which debated various options to expand access to health…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare…
Headline
The U.S. Supreme Court today affirmed a D.C. Circuit Court decision that the Department of Health and Human Services violated the Medicare Act when it changed…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare…