Hospitals are experiencing a nursing shortage that will continue to weigh on hospital finances for at least the next three to four years, according to a new report by Moody’s Investors Service. “An aging population, increased incidents of chronic disease and alternative employment options, such as nurse staffing and traveler agencies, drive increased demand,” says Moody’s Analyst Safat Hannan. “Although the supply of nurses is expected to improve with the expanded nurse training programs and increase in the number of eligible nurse educators, it will still take three to four years for the supply to meet expected demand.”

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