The California Hospital Association and other partners this week launched Behavioral Health Action, a statewide effort to engage candidates and highlight the importance of addressing behavioral health issues in 2018 elections. “We are united behind a powerful cause,” said CHA President and CEO and AHA Board Member Carmela Coyle. “Behavioral health matters because it affects all of us. Young, old, rich, poor. White, Latino, African-American, Asian. If you’re diagnosed with cancer, you’re often surrounded by teams ready to help. But with a behavioral health diagnosis, we often fall into nothingness, without the resources and help and support that’s needed. That has to change.” Other coalition members include the National Alliance on Mental Illness California, Mental Health America of California, California State Sheriff’s Association, California State Association of Counties, California Police Chief’s Association, and Service Employees International Union State Council. According to a recent statewide poll, nearly nine in 10 likely voters want candidates to prioritize behavioral health issues.

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