State and local health departments reported a record 59,349 tickborne disease cases in 2017, 22 percent more than in 2016, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cases of Lyme disease, anaplasmosis/ehrlichiosis, spotted fever rickettsiosis (including Rocky Mountain spotted fever), babesiosis, tularemia and Powassan virus disease all increased, based on data from 17 reporting states. The reason for the increase is unclear, though factors such as temperature, rainfall, humidity and animal host populations can affect the number, the agency said. According to a CDC report in May, illnesses from mosquito, tick and flea bites have more than tripled since 2004 to more than 96,000 a year.

Related News Articles

Headline
Around one in seven immigrant adults or their family members did not participate in a government benefit program in 2018 for fear of risking future green card…
Insights and Analysis
The 20th Annual Not-for-Profit Health Care Investor Conference kicked off today, bringing together the leaders of not-for-profit hospitals and health systems…
Headline
Hospitals and health systems are committed to protecting patients from surprise medical bills and support a federal legislative solution to do so, AHA…
Headline
Sens. Bill Cassidy, R-La., Michael Bennet, D-Colo., Todd Young, R-Ind., Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and Tom Carper, D-Del., today…
Headline
The House Ways and Means Committee today held a hearing examining the impact of racial disparities and social determinants of health on maternal mortality.
Headline
A new AHA issue brief describes how hospitals are investing in affordable housing, based on initial findings from the Accelerating Investments for Healthy…