As the AHA and its members continue to address maternal mortality, the association today voiced support for the Joint Commission’s recently proposed standards for perinatal safety. “Specifically, we support the Joint Commission’s focus on evidence-based procedures and responses that will ensure the most medically appropriate and effective course of treatment for those individuals diagnosed with either maternal hemorrhages or severe hypertension/preeclampsia,” AHA wrote. “In addition, we support the proposed requirement for education of staff, and believe conducting complication-specific training and drills will better prepare providers to act effectively and efficiently when these situations arise. Further, we support the proposed provisions to provide patients and their families with the necessary educational materials to recognize symptoms that require immediate care as another important safeguard in this process.” For more on how hospitals are working to advance better health for mothers and babies, visit https://www.aha.org/better-health-for-mothers-and-babies.

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