A federal judge in New York today voided the Department of Health and Human Services’ 2019 final rule concerning certain statutory conscience rights in health care on lack of statutory authority and constitutional grounds. Released in May and originally scheduled to take effect July 22, the final rule replaced a 2011 rule and, among other things, detailed how HHS' Office for Civil Rights intended to ensure compliance. “The Conscience Provisions recognize and protect undeniably important rights,” U.S. District Judge Paul Engelmayer states in the opinion. “The Court’s decision today leaves HHS at liberty to consider and promulgate rules governing these provisions. In the future, however, the agency must do so within the confines of the [Administrative Procedure Act] and the Constitution.” The case combined challenges to the rule by 23 states and cities, Planned Parenthood and others.
 

Related News Articles

Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services yesterday released a fact sheet for state and local governments seeking Medicare, Medicaid or Children’s…
Headline
An annual report into death by several factors tied to mental health and wellbeing — otherwise referred to as “deaths of despair” — topped 150,000 in 2018. The…
Headline
State Medicaid programs are reporting an uptick in enrollment compared with their fiscal year 2020 projections, due in part to the COVID-19 pandemic. The…
Headline
As part of Mental Health Awareness Month, Bruce Bailey, president and CEO of Tidelands Health based in Georgetown, S.C., talks about how hospitals and health…
Blog
Like all of America’s hospitals, Tidelands Health has a longstanding commitment to improving access to high-quality, affordable services. This includes…
Headline
The AHA, joined by America’s Essential Hospitals, Association of American Medical Colleges, and Federation of American Hospitals today urged the Supreme Court…