The Drug Enforcement Administration last week published an interim final rule expanding access to medication-assisted treatment under the SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act of 2018.

Effective Oct. 30, the rule allows certain practitioners to treat more patients; permanently adds nurse practitioners and physician assistants to the definition of “qualifying other practitioner”; and permits practitioners to complete required opioid training in medical school or residency as well as post-residency.

DEA will accept comments on the rule through Jan. 4.

DEA also will accept comments through Jan. 4 on a proposed rule implementing requirements to report suspicious orders of controlled substances under the Preventing Drug Diversion Act of 2018. The rule would offer multiple options for reporting suspicious orders; establish a centralized database for reporting; define key terms; and require specific record-keeping practices.

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