A recent Congressional Budget Office report comparing the prices commercial health insurers and fee-for-service Medicare pay for hospital and physician services lacks important context and raises more questions than it answers, writes Benjamin Finder, director of policy research and analysis at the AHA. 

“America’s hospitals and health systems have worked hard to reduce costs and improve the quality of care for patients, and the numbers reflect this,” writes Benjamin Finder, director of policy research and analysis at the AHA. “The failure to address these trends, along with the flawed data sources used, makes this report incomplete. We hope policymakers will take broader, more comprehensive view as they seek to untangle what’s driving health care costs in the U.S.”
 

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