A Successful Team Approach to Reduce Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI)

Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 250,000 cases of CLABSI occur in hospitals in the United States each year. An estimated 80,000 CLABSIs occur in intensive care units (ICUs) alone. In November 2008, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) awarded nearly $3 million for a contract to help reduce CLABSIs in hospital ICUs, which has become a nationally recognized problem.

Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 250,000 cases of CLABSI occur in hospitals in the United States each year. An estimated 80,000 CLABSIs occur in intensive care units (ICUs) alone. In November 2008, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) awarded nearly $3 million for a contract to help reduce CLABSIs in hospital ICUs, which has become a nationally recognized problem.

For many years, the Infection Prevention and Control Committee at Silver Cross Hospital conducted CLABSI surveillance in the ICU. A task force was created in the fall of 2013 to reduce the incidence of infection rates throughout the hospital, specifically targeting the ICU. Since implementation of the CLABSI taskforce, CLABSI rates have decreased and improvements have been sustained, especially among the ICU population.

This case study is part of the Illinois Health and Hospital Association's annual Quality Excellence Achievement Awards. Each year, IHA recognizes and celebrates the achievements of Illinois hospitals and health systems in continually improving and transforming health care in the state. These organizations are improving health by striving to achieve the Triple Aim—improving the patient experience of care (including quality and satisfaction), improving the health of populations, and reducing the per capita cost of health care—and the Institute of Medicine's six aims for improvement—safe, effective, patient centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. To learn more, visit https://www.ihaqualityawards.org/javascript-ui/IHAQualityAward/

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