This week, we lost a health care giant – AHA President Emeritus Dick Davidson. Throughout the week, I’ve been reflecting on Dick’s lifetime of leadership and his many accomplishments. They were big. 16 years leading the AHA. More than 20 years leading the Maryland Hospital Association. He was always a strong voice and tireless advocate for patients, hospitals and the communities they serve – and we all are better today because of Dick. But Dick also left another important, quieter legacy: one of taking the time to listen to people and being thoughtful. Dick was a true gentleman. He made time for the people he loved and worked with. In every conversation, he listened closely to the ideas being expressed – including disparate viewpoints. And, he took time to think about what he heard. I left every conversation with Dick – both personal and professional – simply feeling better. That’s an admirable quality and an even better life lesson we all can apply to every aspect of our lives: stop, listen and think.

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