There are more than five million dedicated women and men working in more than 5,000 hospitals in every state and community across America. While those numbers tell an impressive story about the critical role America’s hospitals play in our national life, there’s a better story. It’s a story best told by the women and men of America’s hospitals themselves, and it’s why National Hospital Week is so important. Certainly, every week is National Hospital Week at the AHA, but next week’s events specifically celebrate the contribution that hospitals make to individual health and building strong communities. It also honors all who work in hospitals to both keep people well, and treat the sick with compassion and hope; who fight disease with fierce determination; and who keep the lights on and the doors open 24/7/365. Along with other tools on our website to help celebrate National Hospital Week, there’s also a great video that thanks everyone who works in a hospital for all they do. What stands out is that everyone in the video is real. No actors. No stock footage. No sets. It’s all real – the real women and men of America’s hospitals doing what they do so well … caring, healing and helping. 

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