The AHA and seven other national organizations today urged Congress to “oppose any unwarranted legislative attempts that would undermine the successful efforts by the medical community and professional training organizations to create a unified accreditation system for graduate medical education.” An agreement in 2014 among the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, American Osteopathic Association, and American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine established a five-year transition plan to create a single GME accreditation system by 2020. “Legislation requiring more than one accreditor, such as H.R. 2373, along with any other action to delay or undo this system, will undermine the joint efforts by our organizations and would be detrimental to the nation’s health care system, medical students, residents, and the patients they serve,” the letter states. In addition to the AHA, the letter’s signers include the Association of American Medical Colleges, American Board of Medical Specialties, ACGME, American Medical Association, Council of Medical Specialty Societies, AOA and AACOM.
 

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