Be Well: Cultivating Resilience to Address Health and Well-Being

The rapid pace of change in health care, from system redesign to new payment models to increased data reporting and electronic interoperability, has clinician attention divided among many competing priorities. All the while, the health care workforce itself is shifting and changing to reflect the growing diversity of the nation as well as needs and preferences of our communities. Clinician stress is associated with lower patient satisfaction, patient safety issues, overuse of resources and increased costs of care. Clinicians at the front lines of care, including primary, emergency and critical care, are especially vulnerable. Physicians with less control over their work environment and chaotic schedules and pace are more likely to report symptoms of burnout and it’s no wonder; primary drivers of burnout include regulatory and paperwork burden, deterioration of clinical autonomy, inefficient EHR design/interoperability and professional liability concerns.

Related Resources

AHA Center for Health Innovation Market Scan
With nearly half of all U.S. physicians experiencing burnout, along with nurses and other care team members, the financial costs to the field are mounting. A…
Resources
In conjunction with the Health Forum/AHA Leadership Summit in July 2012, the PLF, along with the Society for Hospital Medicine, hosted an interacti
Resources
Based on the work of the Regional Policy Boards and the Advisory Group on Physician Competency Development the PLF developed recommendations to the
Resources
Together with the American College of Physician Executives, the PLF held a half-day session in July 2013 to better understand the changing landscap
Resources
In October 2013, the American Medical Association (AMA) and the American Hospital Association (AHA) came together to convene a Joint Leade
Resources
A new report from the AHA’s Physician Alliance recommends ways to improve the value of continuing medical education to hospitals.