Case Study: Bon Secours Baltimore Health System

Community Health Worker - Members in Action Case Study

West Baltimore Primary Care Access Collaborative
Bon Secours Baltimore Health System | Baltimore

As the result of a three-year multi-faceted Maryland state planning effort to address health-related challenges, the Maryland Community Health Resources Commission and Department of Health & Mental Hygiene has funded a four-year, $5 million Health Enterprise Zone initiative, the West Baltimore Primary Care Access Collaborative (WBPCAC).

Under BSBHS’ leadership, WBPCAC is a partnership of more than a dozen prominent institutions working together to strengthen the health care system, improve access to care, and reduce persistent and profound health disparities in a large section of West Baltimore. The mission of the Collaborative is to create a sustainable, replicable system of care to reduce health disparities, improve access to health care, reduce costs and expand the primary care and community health workforce.

The Collaborative is focused on four Baltimore neighborhoods in four zip codes that have some of the highest disease burden and worst indicators of social determinants of health in Maryland. The WBPCAC set and attained several specific and quantifiable goals to improve primary health care in its target areas.

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