Appropriate Use of Medical Resources

Appropriate Use of Medical Resources

The “Appropriate Use of Medical Resources” white paper identifies some of the drivers of health care utilization and its contributing factors. More importantly, the paper recommends a way to move forward that will place hospitals at the forefront of innovative change for reducing non-beneficial services while improving health care overall. Among our efforts, we have developed a “top five” list of hospital-based procedures or interventions that should be reviewed and discussed by a patient and physician prior to proceeding.

This paper builds on the "Ensuring a Healthier Tomorrow” report which identified two interconnected strategies to improve care while achieving a sustainable level of health care spending: promote and reward accountability, and use limited health care dollars wisely. As an outgrowth of the latter, the AHA, with guidance from its Committee on Clinical Leadership, Physician Leadership Forum, regional policy boards and governing councils and committees, closely examined the appropriate use of medical resources.

To begin the discussion in your hospital and community, share “Appropriate Use of Medical Resources” with your board, medical staff, and community leaders and use the accompanying discussion guide to explore the issue together. In the coming months, the AHA will roll out resources targeting each of the five procedures or interventions. We also will share best practices from hospitals and health systems that are already on this path. If your organization is well on the path to adopting one, please share your story with us at physicianforum@aha.org.

AHA’s “top five” list of hospital-based procedures or interventions that should be reviewed and discussed by a patient and physician prior to proceeding.
  • Appropriate blood management in inpatient services;
  • Appropriate antimicrobial stewardship;
  • Reducing inpatient admissions for ambulatory-sensitive conditions (i.e., low back pain, asthma, uncomplicated pneumonia);
  • Appropriate use of elective percutaneous coronary intervention; and
  • Appropriate use of the intensive care unit for imminently terminal illness (including encouraging early intervention and discussion about priorities for medical care in the context of progressive disease).

 

 

Related Resources

Case Studies
Public
Montefiore Health System uses the Collaborative Care Model to better serve patients with significant medical and mental health conditions and socioeconomic…
Webinars
Public
In this webinar Rita Carreon, Deputy Vice President, Health with UnidosUS, and Jillian Warriner, manager of community benefit and health improvement at Sharp…
Advisory
Member
As part of the February refresh of Hospital Compare, the Centers for Medicare…
Letter
Member
The AHA and three other national hospital groups today urged the Centers for Medicare…
Case Studies
Public
Columbus Community Hospital – Columbus, NE Interdisciplinary Teams Reduce Readmissions
Letter
Public
A coalition of 40 health care and public health organizations, including the AHA urge the Senate to quickly pass the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness and…